News and Information

September 26, 2016

SUZAN FRECON RECEIVES ARTISTS' LEGACY FOUNDATION 2016 ARTIST AWARD

Unrestricted gift of $25,000 given to an accomplished painter or sculptor where evidence of the hand is a significant factor in making art.

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA—Artists' Legacy Foundation Executive Director Pauline Shaver announced today that painter Suzan Frecon, noted for her large abstract oil paintings, is the recipient of the 2016 Artist Award. The Artist Award is an unrestricted gift of $25,000 given annually to an accomplished painter or sculptor where evidence of the hand is a significant factor in making art. This year is the 10th Anniversary of the Artist Award.

book of paint

book of paint, 2015, oil on linen, two panels, 108 x 87 3/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner, New York/London

In the late 1990s, painter Squeak Carnwath, sculptor Viola Frey, and community advocate Gary Knecht created Artists' Legacy Foundation to encourage artists to think about their legacies and how their estates might support other artists. Viola Frey (d. 2004) became a Legacy Artist after her death; her bequest launched the Artist Award.

Painters and sculptors are anonymously nominated for the annual Artist Award and candidates are unaware that they are under consideration. Nominators and jurors are distinguished thinkers and makers with a depth of expertise in their milieus and fields. The 2016 panel of jurors included: Chief Curator at the Modern Art Museum of Forth Worth Michael Auping, painter Jane Hammond and sculptor Suzanne Caporael.

"Honored," said Frecon (b. 1941). "The recognition of your peers is so important. If your peers respect your work, that is really wonderful." Frecon, who is politically and environmentally active, said she is exploring what to do with the $25,000 and may donate it to an effort or organization that connects art and society, "especially in these dire times when human beings need art." She recalled 20th century poet, playwright and director Bertolt Brecht's remark that, "Art is not a mirror held up to reality, but a hammer with which to shape it."

Frecon is acclaimed for her complex, transporting abstract oil paintings and watercolors that reflect formal interests in color and stroke. Her immersive works, composed with subtle, interacting arrangements of color, are meticulously planned and include pigments she grinds herself. Roberta Smith of The New York Times asserted that the "physicality of the work stems from Ms. Frecon's earthy color sense [and] are always clearly handmade, painted with a meditative quality that evokes Morandi." Carol Diehl, remarking on the intensity of color and surface wrote in ARTNews: Her "edges are the accumulation of many passes of the brush—a minimalism achieved by maximalism." On the occasion of Frecon's inclusion in the 2010 Whitney Biennial, Todd Levin in Flash Art, said, "Frecon, at almost 70, is still a hotshot" and is enthused that her works "show the extent of what can be done in painting."

book of paint

earth takes its guidelines, 2014, oil on linen, two panels, 108 x 87 3/8 inches. Courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner, New York/London

On the topic of her hand in her work, Frecon asserted: "I need to mix the colors myself; I need to know how the colors feel—I need to be in touch with everything I do."

"An austere sensuality," said Hammond. "When you look at the pigment in her works, you feel the minerality of the paint." "She has talent, commitment to that talent, and her commitment has endured long enough to serve as inspirational to others," said Caporael.

"These are old school abstractions that seem completely fresh," said Auping. "The paintings have a quiet strength and sureness that comes from her long experience working with the medium of paint and watercolor, knowing their material qualities and her own nervous system very precisely. The edge of every color and line reflects a human rhythm and touch that seems so honest in their insightful imperfections, yet exactly right."

The Artist Award is designed to encourage professional enrichment, while allowing recipients to spend more creative time in their studios. There are no restrictions on the use of the funds by the recipient.

10th ANNIVERSARY OF THE ARTIST AWARD

Shaver also announced today that the 10th Anniversary of the Artist Award will be recognized with a special video documentary that explores the pioneering, physically inventive, and tactile Artist Award recipients over the last decade, including last year's recipient, Jim Nutt, noted for his intricate and psychological portraits of imaginary women and whom Ken Johnson of The New York Times has called "a supremely elegant and inventive stylist."

Said Shaver: "The Artist Award recognizes achievement in work made by the hand, along with demonstrated professional accomplishment. It is a legacy award and a philanthropic program of the Foundation."

A complete list of previous recipients of the Artist Award and jurors who selected them may be found at artistslegacyfoundation.org.

ABOUT SUSAN FRECON
Born in Mexico, Pennsylvania, Suzan Frecon lives and works in New York. After earning her degree in fine arts from the Pennsylvania State University, she spent three years at the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Frecon has exhibited widely in the United States and internationally. In 2008, her work was the subject of a major solo exhibition, "form, color, illumination: Suzan Frecon painting", at The Menil Collection in Houston, Texas, which traveled to Kunstmuseum Bern in Switzerland. She has participated in a number of group exhibitions including the 2000 and 2010 Whitney Biennial. Permanent collections which hold works by the artist include the Art Institute of Chicago; Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts; Kunstmuseum Bern, Switzerland; The Menil Collection, Houston, Texas; The Morgan Library & Museum, New York; The Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; The Museum of Modern Art, New York; National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.; and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. Since 2008, her work has been represented by David Zwirner, New York/London.


For additional information and high-resolution images, please contact Brent Jones, for Artists’ Legacy Foundation, 917-280-6217, brentjonesimage@gmail.com.



September 21, 2015

JIM NUTT RECEIVES ARTISTS' LEGACY FOUNDATION 2015 ARTIST AWARD

Unrestricted gift of $25,000 given to an accomplished painter or sculptor where evidence of the hand is a significant factor in making art.

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA—Artists' Legacy Foundation is pleased to announce that Jim Nutt, the Chicago painter and draftsman, is the recipient of its 2015 Artist Award. The Artist Award is an unrestricted gift of $25,000 given to an accomplished painter or sculptor where evidence of the hand is a significant factor in making art. Since its inception in 2007, the Award has been juried by a distinguished list of thinkers and makers.

Trim

Trim, 2010, acrylic on linen with MDF frame, 25 3/8 x 24 3/8 inches © Jim Nutt; Courtesy David Nolan Gallery, New York

In the late 1990s, painter Squeak Carnwath and community advocate Gary Knecht envisioned a foundation centered on painters and sculptors encouraging fellow artists; protecting the legacies of deceased "Legacy Artists"; and supporting the visual arts. As plans advanced, colleague, friend and groundbreaking sculptor Viola Frey joined in and in 2000, the three incorporated Artists' Legacy Foundation. After Frey's death in 2004, her bequest made possible the Artist Award program.

Each year painters and sculptors are anonymously nominated for the Award and candidates are unaware that they are under consideration. Nominators and jurors are art world peers with a depth of expertise in their fields. The 2015 panel of jurors included: Curator of Contemporary Art at Santa Barbara Museum of Art and 2015 Visiting Scholar at American Academy of Rome Julie Joyce, Painter Lucinda Parker and Sculptor Peter Shelton.

Drawing for Trim

Drawing for “Trim,” 2008, graphite on paper, 15 x 14 inches © Jim Nutt; Courtesy David Nolan Gallery, New York

"Shocked. I was taken aback," confessed Jim Nutt (b. 1938), after receiving news that he is the recipient of the 2015 Artist Award. Nutt said he may use a portion of the Award to underwrite the organization of his earlier work and career-related archival material and travel to Berlin and Hamburg, for the first time in his life, to view early 19th Century German paintings.

Nutt is noted for his intricate and psychological portraits of imaginary women. His dense, angular compositions are painstakingly hand made and reflect a formal interest in the face. Ken Johnson of The New York Times has called Nutt "a supremely elegant and inventive stylist." David Ebony, writing in Art in America, remarked on the "sculptural solidity" of the nose, lips and chins in Nutt's absorbing, grotesque characterdriven acrylic paintings and pencil drawings. In 2011, the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago presented an acclaimed solo retrospective of the last 20 years of Nutt's work. Ted Loos of The New York Times quoted Museum of Contemporary Art Curator Lynne Warren's assertion that Nutt is "an artist's artist."

"Dangerous and glorious at the same time—like a fist in your face," said juror Parker.

"A kind of intensity and violence," said Shelton. "There is a graphic clarity in his hand painted work—and Pop, Cubism and Folk."

Plumb

Plumb, 2004, acrylic on linen with MDF frame, 26 3/8 x 25 3/8 inches © Jim Nutt; Courtesy David Nolan Gallery, New York.

"His reinvention of the portrait is quirky, determined and bracing," said Joyce. "Nutt is a particularly apt choice for the Artist Award. Not only is he an accomplished and deserving artist in his own right, but he has advocated the work of other artists throughout his career. The ethos of Artists' Legacy Foundation—artists helping artists—carries throughout Nutt's work as an influential artist as well as a catalyst for other artists.”

The Artist Award is designed to encourage professional enrichment, while allowing recipients to spend more creative time in their studios. There are no restrictions on the use of the funds by the recipient. Highly regarded painter Mary Weatherford, noted for her emotionally charged and atmospheric Flashe on linen works that incorporate neon lighting tubes, received the 2014 Artist Award.

ABOUT JIM NUTT

Born in Pittsfield, Massachusetts, Jim Nutt lives and works in Chicago. He graduated from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago in 1965. The Hairy Who collective received its first exhibition at Hyde Park Art Center in Chicago in 1966 and in 1974 Nutt had a major museum exhibition at Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago that traveled to the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis and the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York. His work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago; Hanes Gallery, Scales Fine Arts Center, Wake Forest University, North Carolina; Milwaukee Art Museum; Henry Art Gallery, Seattle; National Museum of American Art, Washington, D.C.; Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati; and elsewhere. His group exhibitions include shows such as Exquisite Corpses: Drawing and Disfiguration, The Museum of Modern Art, New York; 1969, P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City; Disparities and Deformities: Our Grotesque, Site Santa Fe; and Open Ends, Museum of Modern Art, New York. The artist is represented by David Nolan Gallery.

For high-resolution images, please contact brentjonesimage@gmail.com.



October 24, 2014

Yayoi Shionoiri joins the Artists' Legacy Foundation Board of Directors

Yayoi Shionoiri

Yayoi Shionoiri, Photo credit: Masami Shioda

Oakland, California—April 13, 2014 Executive Director Pauline Shaver today announced Yayoi Shionoiri, Associate General Counsel of The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, has joined the board of Artists' Legacy Foundation. Ms. Shionoiri is a published specialist and frequent presenter on art law and is respected for her research on the application of copyright and intellectual property law to art issues. In her role at The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, she advises on the legal aspects of matters that include exhibitions, special projects, non-profit operations, intellectual property issues, and digital media strategy. From 2008 to 2011, she served as legal advisor to Japanese contemporary artist Takashi Murakami, managing his contract negotiations and worldwide intellectual property rights.

Ms. Shionoiri joins an accomplished board of artists and executives who provide a depth of advice, guidance and oversight to advance Artists' Legacy Foundation's mission and programs to support visual artists and promote and protect the legacies of deceased "Legacy Artists." The Board of Directors includes: painter Squeak Carnwath; community advocate Gary Knecht; Leah Levy, director of The Jay DeFeo Trust; Timothy Rub, director of the Philadelphia Museum of Art; sculptor Sandra Shannonhouse, trustee of The Robert Arneson Trust and director of the Arneson Archive; and Eric Shiner, director of The Andy Warhol Museum.

"Yayoi's knowledge and point of view will enhance our abilities to shepherd the reputations and resources of Legacy Artists and allow them to posthumously support other visual artists through our programs and annual Artist Award," said Ms. Carnwath. "Legacy Artists are painters and sculptors who made significant contributions to the visual arts during their lifetimes and are interested in both protecting their legacy and recognizing and supporting other artists." "I am so delighted to join the board of an organization of artists and arts professionals working together to ensure that artists' voices accurately extend and amplify beyond the present," said Ms. Shionoiri. "It is wonderful to know that an institution like Artists' Legacy Foundation exists—for and by artists."

Ms. Shionoiri received her A.B., cum laude, from Harvard University and her J.D. from Cornell Law School. She earned her M.A. from Columbia University in Modern Art. A US-Japan Leadership Program Fellow and an Asia Society Asia 21 Young Leader, she actively contributes to the ongoing development of cultural collaborations and political ties across nations.

For high-resolution images, please contact brentjonesimage@gmail.com.



October 24, 2014

Eric Shiner joins Artists' Legacy Foundation Board of Directors

Mary Weatherford neptune's net

Eric Shiner

Oakland, California—October 24, 2014 Executive Director, Pauline Shaver, announced that Eric Shiner, director of The Andy Warhol Museum, has joined the board of Artists' Legacy Foundation. Mr. Shiner is noted for his knowledge and connoisseurship of the art and legacy of Andy Warhol, and his successful leadership of The Warhol since 2011. He is an active writer, lecturer, and translator; a contributing editor for Art AsiaPacific magazine; and an adjunct professor of art history at the University of Pittsburgh.

Mr. Shiner joins a board of accomplished artists and professionals who provide a depth of advice, guidance, and oversight in support of Artists' Legacy Foundation's mission and programs to nurture and encourage artists; promote and protect the legacies of deceased "Legacy Artists"; and support the visual arts. The Board of Directors includes: painter Squeak Carnwath; community advocate Gary Knecht; The Jay DeFeo Trust Director Leah Levy; Philadelphia Museum of Art Director Timothy Rub; and sculptor Sandra Shannonhouse, Trustee of the Robert Arneson Trust and Director of the Arneson Archive.

In the late 1990s, Ms. Carnwath and Mr. Knecht envisioned a foundation centered on artists encouraging fellow artists. Colleague and groundbreaking sculptor Viola Frey learned of their work and the three incorporated Artists' Legacy Foundation in 2000. Ms. Frey, who died in 2004, entrusted her legacy to the Foundation.

"Eric understands the cultural reach of Andy Warhol and takes advantage of social media and other new strategies to dynamically engage with audiences around the world, including underserved audiences," said Ms. Carnwath. "A goal of Artists' Legacy Foundation is to serve as a resource for the public, and to deepen understanding of the life and work of Legacy Artists, like Viola Frey. A Twitter account was launched this year, @ViolaFreyArt, and a comprehensive new website is in production. We look forward to Eric's partnership to expand and strengthen our contributions to artists and the arts."

Mary Weatherford viajes

Eric Shiner, Director of The Andy Warhol Museum

"I am thrilled to join the board of the Artist' Legacy Foundation. I am committed to making sure that the legacies of America's great artists are preserved, celebrated, and promoted, and I hope that my deep experience in doing the above with Andy Warhol's legacy will help this dynamic organization as it moves into the future."

Mr. Shiner received his Bachelor of Philosophy in the History of Art and Architecture and Japanese Language and Literature at the University of Pittsburgh's Honors College. He received the Japanese Government's Ministry of Education Monbusho Prize and attended graduate school at Osaka University, where he earned an MA in the History of Art, later becoming assistant curator of the 2001 Yokohama Triennale. In 2007 he curated "Making a Home: Japanese Contemporary Artists in New York" at Japan Society in New York City, where he was also previously an adjunct professor at The Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art. Mr. Shiner joined The Warhol in 2008 as the Milton Fine Curator of Art and became acting director in January, 2011; in July of that year he was named permanent director.

MARY WEATHERFORD IS 2014 ARTIST AWARD RECIPIENT
Artists' Legacy Foundation recently announced that Mary Weatherford, one of the most influential Los Angeles-based painters of her generation, is the recipient of its 2014 Artist Award. The Artist Award is an unrestricted gift of $25,000 given to an accomplished painter or sculptor where evidence of the hand is a significant factor in making art. Since its inception in 2007, the Award has been juried by a distinguished list of thinkers and makers. Each year painters and sculptors are anonymously nominated for the Award and candidates are unaware that they are under consideration.

For high-resolution images, please contact brentjonesimage@gmail.com.



September 19, 2014

MARY WEATHERFORD TO RECEIVE ARTISTS' LEGACY FOUNDATION 2014 ARTIST AWARD

Unrestricted gift of $25,000 given to an accomplished painter or sculptor where evidence of the hand is a significant factor in making art.

Mary Weatherford neptune's net

Neptune's Net, 2013, Flashe and neon on linen. 93 x 79 inches. Courtesy of Brennan & Griffin, New York, NY and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA. Photography: Robert Wedemeyer.

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA—Artists' Legacy Foundation is pleased to announce that Mary Weatherford, one of the most influential Los Angeles-based painters of her generation, is the recipient of its 2014 Artist Award. Weatherford will be presented with the eighth annual Award at a private reception on November 2, 2014. The Artist Award is an unrestricted gift of $25,000 given to an accomplished painter or sculptor where evidence of the hand is a significant factor in making art. Since its inception in 2007, the Award has been juried by a distinguished list of thinkers and makers.

In the late 1990s, painter Squeak Carnwath and community advocate Gary Knecht envisioned a foundation centered on painters and sculptors encouraging fellow artists; protecting the legacies of deceased "Legacy Artists"; and supporting the visual arts. In 2000, Carnwath, Knecht, and colleague, friend, and groundbreaking sculptor Viola Frey together incorporated Artists' Legacy Foundation. After Frey's death in 2004, her bequest made possible the Artist Award program.

Mary Weatherford (b. 1963) is noted for her emotionally charged and atmospheric Flashe on linen works that incorporate neon lighting tubes, letting, as Christopher Knight of The Los Angeles Times remarked, "the draped electrical cords essential to powering their glowing artificial light become an integral part of the composition." Her transcendental works, painted in deep, rich expanses of color, are encounters of mortality and morality—the "serious stuff", she has said—and invoke the silken, soft draping strategies of the late innovator Eva Hesse and the glowing, sparse post-minimalism of light sculptor Keith Sonnier.

Mary Weatherford viajes

Viajes, 2013, Flashe and neon on linen. 66 x 58 x 3 3/8 inches. Courtesy of Brennan & Griffin, New York, NY and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA. Photography: Robert Wedemeyer.

"Incredible," said Weatherford, after receiving news of the Artist Award.

"I am very honored and delighted. I've known [Legacy Artist] Viola Frey's art since I was a teenager. Her work taught me that art can be colorful and serious."

ollowing a highly acclaimed solo exhibition at David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles earlier this year, she debuts this month a site-specific work in the Marian Miner Cook Athenaeum at Claremont McKenna College in Claremont, California. In conjunction with the project, the first major book about her work will be published by the college's Gould Center for Humanistic Studies. She is also included in the current exhibition Variations: Conversations in and Around Abstract Painting, at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the upcoming survey The Forever Now at The Museum of Modern Art in New York, which will explore the painted surface as a "platform, map, or metaphoric screen on which genres intermingle, morph, and collide."

Each year painters and sculptors are anonymously nominated for the Award and candidates are unaware that they are under consideration.

Mary Weatherford the dam

the dam, 2013, Flashe and neon on linen. 55.25 x 77.375 x 3.75 inches. Courtesy of Brennan & Griffin, New York, NY and David Kordansky Gallery, Los Angeles, CA. Photography: Robert Wedemeyer.

Nominators and jurors are art world peers with a depth of expertise in their fields. The 2014 panel of jurors included: DeCordova Museum and Sculpture Park Chief Curator and Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs Jennifer Gross; Los Angeles County Museum of Art Curator and Department Head of Contemporary Art Franklin Sirmans; and newly named Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts Curator of Contemporary Art Jodi Throckmorton.

"Mary Weatherford's use of neon is a radical move, a formal solution, and follow-through of her hands-on process," said Gross. "With it she has created an assemblage, a certain kind of light that she could not create in pigment."

"Whether it's creating the illusion of a void, or simply mixing color pigment in ways never seen before, Mary Weatherford's paintings are potent reminders of the wonders to be had in looking at art," said Sirmans.

"Hallucinogenic," effused Throckmorton. "The bringing in of electricity is a gesture and strategy, making the use of the hand more apparent in the paintings."

The Artist Award is designed to encourage professional enrichment, while allowing recipients to spend more creative time in their studios. There are no restrictions on the use of the funds by the recipient.

ABOUT MARY WEATHERFORD

Born in Ojai, California, Weatherford lives and works in Los Angeles. She earned her B.A. at Princeton University in 1984 and was a Helena Rubinstein Fellow in the Whitney Museum of American Art Independent Study Program in 1985. She earned her M.F.A. from the Milton Avery School of the Arts at Bard College in 2006. Her work has been the subject of solo exhibitions at LAXART, Los Angeles; Todd Madigan Gallery, California State University, Bakersfield, CA; Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA; and P.S. 1 Institute of Contemporary Art, New York. Her group exhibitions include Landscape into Abstraction, Orange County Museum of Art, Newport Beach, CA; Sharing Sunsets, Museum of Contemporary Art, Tucson, AZ; Primarily Paint, Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; Cadavre Exquis, The Drawing Center, New York; Postcards from Alphaville: Jean Luc Godard in Contemporary Art, 1963 - 1992, P.S. 1 Institute of Contemporary Art, New York; Painting Culture, fiction/nonfiction, New York and Fine Arts Gallery, University of California at Irvine; and Plastic Fantastic Lover (object a), BlumHelman Warehouse, New York.

For high-resolution images, please contact brentjonesimage@gmail.com.



September 19, 2013

ARTISTS' LEGACY FOUNDATION 2013 ARTIST AWARD - $25,000 TO DONA NELSON

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA—The Artists Legacy Foundation is pleased to announce its seventh annual Artist Award will be presented to noted American painter Dona Nelson on November 2, 2013. The purpose of the Artist Award is to recognize and honor the career and accomplishments of an outstanding visual artist whose primary medium is painting or sculpture.

In Step

In Step, 2013, recto (left) and verso (right), dye, acrylic paint, painted string and muslin on canvas. 90 x 60 inches.

Established in 2007, the Artist Award annually provides an unrestricted $25,000 award to one artist in order to encourage his or her creative pursuits. Ten to fifteen painters and sculptors are anonymously nominated and candidates are unaware that they are under consideration. Nominators and jurors are art world peers with expertise in their fields. The Foundations 2013 panel of jurors included painter Ron Bechet, visual artist Sarah McEneaney, and Berkeley Art Museum Director Larry Rinder.

When informed of the award this summer, 2013 Artist Award recipient Nelson was navigating a heat wave in Philadelphia, her air conditioner on the fritz, and packing up paintings for a group show in the fall. Overwhelmed, she said, "The timing couldn't be better."

Spacey Characters

Spacey Characters (recto), 2010, acrylic and cheesecloth on canvas. 80 x 80 inches.

Regarded as one of the most vital, intellectually considered, aggressively tactile, and physically inventive American painters of her generation, Nelson is a 2011 Foundation for Contemporary Arts grant recipient and has received institutional solo exhibitions at The Weatherspoon Art Museum at the University of North Carolina in Greensboro and The Morris Gallery at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in Philadelphia. An influential educator, she is a Professor of Painting and Drawing, Tyler School of Art, Temple University, in Philadelphia. Critic Roberta Smith noted in The New York Times: "Nelson has painted prolifically and innovatively for nearly 40 years, following her own path through the gap between abstraction and representation."

Nelson describes her practice as an investigation: "In paintings, my own, and others, I am interested in imagination coupled with a quality of facticity. I have no over-riding ideology about painting. I don't know how it relates to culture, because I can't see paintings in photographs. I am a woman, but I don't know how that fact impacts my studio practice. I think even mild, general, ideas about gender identity and other aspects of "identity" are inhibiting, indeed hostile, to artistic exploration. What my paintings are, in relation to who I am, remains a mystery to me."

In Step

Spacey Characters (verso), 2010, acrylic and cheesecloth on canvas. 80 x 80 inches.

And continues, "I start my two sided paintings by stretching one side and working on it for a while, and then reversing the canvas on the stretcher and working on the other side for a while, and I work back and forth that way, until I feel that there is a front side of the painting and a back side. From then on, the front is always the front of the painting and the back is always the back of the painting, but I often continue to work back and forth from one side to another. I never try to ‘improve' one side of the painting independently of the other. I do not consider these works to be deconstructions of the form, Painting, or sculptures, though one can walk around them. The sides of the paintings are often very different from each other, and that interests me - the way in which two very different visual and physical manifestations can be inseparable from, and, indeed, create each other."

For high-resolution images, please contact brentjonesimage@gmail.com.



September 21, 2012

SIXTH ANNUAL ARTISTS' LEGACY FOUNDATION AWARD GIVEN TO SCULPTOR DONNA DENNIS

$25,000 award goes to Donna Dennis—New York artist, Guggenheim fellow, multiple NEA grantee and Whitney Biennial alumnus (among other honors)—who first achieved notoriety in the mid 1970s with her large architecturally-inspired sculptural installations that include the groundbreaking Subway Station and Tourist Cabin works; her much anticipated Coney Night Maze premieres in June 2013 at the Neuberger Museum of Art in Purchase, NY.

The Artists' Legacy Foundation Award was established in 2007; it provides an unrestricted $25,000 award to one artist each year in order to encourage his or her ongoing creative pursuits.

Tourist Cabins On Park Avenue

Tourist Cabins On Park Avenue, 2007, Park Avenue median at 52nd and 53rd Streets, mixed media with interior lighting and satellite dish. Each cabin 78 x 52 1/4 x 72 inches.

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA—The Artists' Legacy Foundation is pleased to announce that its sixth annual Artist Award of $25,000 will be presented to noted American sculptor Donna Dennis. The purpose of the Artist Award is to recognize and honor the career and accomplishments of an outstanding visual artist whose primary medium is painting or sculpture.

Each year, ten to fifteen painters and sculptors are nominated for the Artist's Legacy Foundation's Artist Award; the nominators and jurors are art world peers with expertise in their fields. The Foundation's 2012 panel of jurors included painter Beverly McIver, artist Lesley Dill, and poet, art critic and professor emeritus at the San Francisco Art Institute Bill Berkson, who says, "Donna Dennis is a quiet wonder. For over 40 years, she has been making these marvelous structures that become places of both fond recognition and mystery."

All candidates for this award are nominated anonymously, and the artists are unaware they are under consideration until the award is granted.

Moccasin Creek Cabins

Moccasin Creek Cabins, 1983, mixed media installation at Moccasin Creek, Aberdeen, South Dakota. Each cabin 78 x 54 1/2 x 72 inches.

When informed of the award, Dennis was walking down the street using her cellphone. "I told her that I had some good news and suggested that she might want to sit down," says Artists' Legacy Foundation Executive Director Sharon Tanenbaum. "So she settled for stopping and leaning against a wall. She was overwhelmed and said the timing couldn't be better; she'd just finished a monumental piece for an upcoming exhibition, and she is gearing up to start another major work, which this award will now help make a reality."

The 2012 award recipient, Donna Dennis, has been a practicing artist for the past four decades. Born in 1942 in Springfield, Ohio, she moved to Rye, New York in 194¬9 and received her BA with a major in art in 1964 from Carleton College in Minnesota. She furthered her art pursuit at College Art Studies Abroad in Paris, before returning to the U.S. in the mid-1960s to study at the Art Students League in New York, where she currently resides. In describing her passion for her work, Dennis asserts, "I cannot remember a time when I did not want to be an artist."

In addition to her Guggenheim Fellowship and status as both a Whitney Biennial alumnus and the recipient of several NEA Fellowships, Dennis has exhibited throughout the world in major museums as well as public art installations. Her work was featured in two Venice Biennales and exhibitions at the Tate Gallery in London, Ludwig Forum Internationale Kunst, in Aachen Germany, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington DC and numerous others.

In the mid 1970s Donna Dennis first came to the attention of both critics and the public with her large architecturally inspired installations from her Subway Stations and Tourist Cabins series. She is among a group of noted artists—including Alice Aycock, Siah Armajani, and Mary Miss—who pushed sculpture toward the domain of architecture. Deborah Everett, writing for the magazine Sculpture, even asserted that Dennis "actually made architecture," specifically, "American vernacular architecture" that was then transformed into sculpture when Dennis "created her earnest, plain-spoken ‘Tourist Cabins' at the outset of her career," which Everett then notes, "had the impact of cultural icons."

Deep Station

Deep Station, 1981-1985, mixed media with sound. 144 x 240 x 288 inches.

The tourist-cabin inspired sculptures are roughly ¾ scale and contain details such as windows, electric lights, beds, curtains and screening. They have been exhibited indoors at the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Walker Art Center, Minneapolis; Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC; Tate Gallery, London; and the Venice Biennale. When presented outdoors they were seen in such settings as New York's City Hall Park, Storm King Art Center in Mountainville, NY, Moccasin Creek in Aberdeen, South Dakota (where they were afloat), and other public venues. Each new setting over the years has produced a new way of thinking about these metaphorical works inspired by American roadside architecture.

Moccasin Creek Cabins

Cataract Cabin, 1993-94, acrylic and enamel on wood and Masonite with glass, metal, grout, rope, pump, water, mirror. 144 x 144 x 144 inches.

Dennis's work is in many prominent collections including those of the Brooklyn Museum, Cleveland Art Museum, the Microsoft Collection in Seattle, the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, the Ludwig Forum fur Internationale Kunst in Aachen, Germany, the Indianapolis Museum, the San Diego Museum of Art and the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington DC.

Generously deconstructing her architectural prototypes with a language that is both evocatively detailed and highly formal, her work is steeped in a deep well of personal emotion.

Beginning with the early Hotel series (1972-74) and Tourist Cabin Porch (Maine) (1976), Dennis has always seen her work as representing stopping places, points of passage on a metaphorical journey through life. Her early subway-inspired works led her to imagine exploring dark, subterranean, subconscious realms, envisioning a track (or river) that divided again and again, allowing for infinitely expanding possibilities. Tourist Cabins on Park Avenue, constructed in 2007, transformed the Park Avenue median between 52nd and 53rd Streets in Manhattan.

Deeply affected by the women's movement of the early 70s with its potential for recasting the entire language of art, Dennis's Deep Station paralleled the shifting consciousness of the era with the shifting going on deep in the tectonic plates of the earth itself. Later, themes of death and the underworld would appear throughout BLUE BRIDGE/red shift resulting in "an almost mythic invocation of mortality" according to George Melrod, writing in Art in America.

Coney Night Maze

Coney Night Maze (detail), 1996-2009, mixed media with sound. 150 x 324 x 232 inches.

Dennis's much anticipated Coney Night Maze is scheduled to premiere in June 2013 at the Neuberger Museum of Art in Purchase, NY. Coney Night Maze represents thirteen years of labor—some of it under the shadow of 9/11—that continues all of these themes but with a new conclusion. The large, complex sculptural installation of the maze, with its dead ends, locked gates and mute signs that provide no words of direction at first creates a sense of dislocation, confusion, and a feeling of being caught. Two ticket booths stand witness but give no aid. How does one escape? How does one reach the track and its promise of a ride?

For high-resolution images, please contact info@artistslegacyfoundation.org.



September 20, 2011

THE ARTISTS' LEGACY FOUNDATION AWARDS
$25,000 TO JUDITH SHEA

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA The Artists' Legacy Foundation is pleased to announce that its fifth annual Artist Award of $25,000 will be presented to noted American sculptor Judith Shea. The Artist Award recognizes and honors the accomplishments of an outstanding visual artist whose primary medium is painting or sculpture.

Judith Shea

Idol, 2010-11, bronze, felt, other media. 75 x 18 x 28 inches.

For more than three decades Judith Shea has made a study of the human form in many guises and materials. From simple, iconic textile ‘clothes', and hollow bronze forms around an absent figure, to carved wooden ‘anti' monuments, her work has often ironically quoted art history to comment on life now.

Each year, ten artists, either painters or sculptors, are nominated anonymously by five nominators for the Artist Award. This year the Foundation's panel of jurors included Nene Humphrey, artist who works in multiple media; Katherine Sherwood, painter, and Lilly Wei, art critic. The nominators and the jurors are art world peers who are chosen for their expertise. The 2011 jurors agreed: "It was very difficult to select the award recipient because all nominees were very skilled and extremely worthy."

Lower Manhattan Classic

Lower Manhattan Classic, 2006-09, bronze, felt, other media. 75 x 48 x 20 inches.

Judith Shea has been a practicing artist for over 30 years. Ms. Shea was born in Philadelphia, PA in 1948 and has resided in New York City since 1967. Her nominator wrote: "Judith Shea's becoming a sculptor is a unique story. Her early training was as a clothing designer. She has a degree in Fashion Design from the Parsons School of Design and later earned a B.F.A. from Parsons/the New School for Social Research. In fact, Judith never became a fashion designer because becoming a sculptor was much more satisfying."

Although Shea did not pursue fashion, she credits that early Parsons training as crucial to her understanding of how to build the figure in 3D. Her works of the 1970s were made of cloth and suggested unassembled pattern pieces. By 1981, influenced by research for a lecture on early medieval armor, and seeking to bring more volume into her cloth works, she began casting in iron, and bronze. From this technology emerged the headless, armless hollow sheaths, symbolizing women, and the voluminous overcoats which were male surrogates. Juxtaposing the figure with abstract forms, and then pairing figures, gave added psychological complexity to her work. By the 1990s, to allow for the inclusion of the complete figure - heads, etc., she added another medium, carved wood. In this material she explored the sculptural tropes which had been tossed by Modernism; the statue, and the monument, seeking to inject contemporary meaning into these ancient forms. By 1995, after her Rome Prize year in Italy, she had created two carved wooden equestrians, along with a number of other ‘anti-monuments'.

Post-Balzac

Post-Balzac, 1991, edition of 3, bronze. 98 1/2 x 28 1/2 x 28 1/2 inches.

Following her Italian experience, she traveled to Oaxaca, Mexico where she encountered churches full of the figures of saints, all of them newly dressed in handmade clothes. Shea had been brought up as a Catholic and, as she said, "The first sculptures that I ever saw were not in museums but figures in churches." After her return to New York, she began to revisit the use of cloth and clothes from her early works, and to incorporate it into her new work, combining many of the materials and skills she had acquired in her career's long journey.

After 9/11, Shea began a body of work she calls "The Legacy Collection" provoked by the imagery and media saturation of the catastrophic events of September 11 and her response to it. A near-by resident of, and eye witness to the event, she wanted to impart the intimate reality, rather than the spectacular one. Her carved, mannequin-like figures, stitched into grey industrial felt, paired, like twins, dust-saturated, and shocked, with their faces uplifted, as if in expectation, become expressive and narrative, rather than glamorous and promotional. "This series," in her nominator's words, "brings together all of Judith's concerns from the beginning of her career as a sculptor to the present." Her sculptures today convey powerful imagery that goes beyond its formal sculptural quality to communicate personal and societal issues.

Shield

Shield, 1989, bronze, stone. 72 x 15 x 15 inches. Collection of Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, NE.

Judith Shea's work is well represented in museum collections including the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Washington, DC; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City; the Museum of Modern Art, New York City; the National Gallery, Washington, DC; the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York City; and the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis . Solo exhibitions of her work have taken place at the Laumeier Sculpture Park and Museum, St. Louis; the Museum of Contemporary Art, San Diego; the National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, DC; the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City; and the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts, Philadelphia, as well as at a number of other American museums. Throughout her career, she has been represented in group exhibitions including important shows at the Barbican Art Centre, London; Centro Cultural de Arte Contemporaneo, Mexico, DF; the Guggenheim Museum, New York; The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; PS1 Contemporary Art Center, Long Island City, New York; the Sheldon Museum of Art, Lincoln, Nebraska; and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Santa Barbara, California, to name a few.

Awards include the National Academy's Dunwiddie Prize in Sculpture; The Rome Prize, Trustees Award; The Rockefeller Foundation Fellowship to Bellagio, Italy; The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum's Sculptor in Residence at Chesterwood, MA, and two National Endowment for the Arts Fellowships in Sculpture.

Ms. Shea has given back to her community by teaching at Yale University, New York University, The San Francisco Art Institute, the School of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, Parsons School of Design, Skowhegan School, and the University of Pennsylvania. She currently serves on the Exhibition Committee of the National Academy in New York.

Ms. Shea was surprised by the award and when reached by phone said: "Receiving the Artists' Legacy Foundation's 2011 Artist Award is a total surprise, and I am so pleased that I was selected. It means a great deal to me." A ceremony honoring the artist will take place in the San Francisco Bay Area during November.

A brief bio and complete resume of Judith Shea may be downloaded here.



September 16, 2010

THE ARTISTS' LEGACY FOUNDATION AWARDS
$25,000 TO JOHN OUTTERBRIDGE

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA—The Artists' Legacy Foundation is pleased to announce that its fourth annual Artist Award of $25,000 will be given to Los Angeles sculptor John Outterbridge—a renowned artist, ardent community activist, and esteemed arts administrator and teacher. The Artist Award recognizes and honors the accomplishments of an outstanding visual artist whose primary medium is painting or sculpture.

Hinged Windo with Asafetida Bags Branded

Hinged Window with Asafetida Bags Branded, 2008, mixed media. 20 1/4 x 17 1/4 x 3 1/4 inches.

Each year the Artists' Legacy Foundation asks five nominators, who remain anonymous, to propose two painters or sculptors for the Artist Award. A panel of three jurors reviews artwork of the ten nominees and selects the recipient. This year the Foundation's jurors were Mildred Howard, artist and teacher; Barbara MacAdam, art critic and deputy editor of ARTnews; and Robert Taplin, sculptor, writer, and teacher. The nominators and jurors are all art world peers, chosen for their expertise.

"John Outterbridge is known as a Los Angeles artist, an integral artist in the history of Assemblage, and a key proponent of a peculiarly American style invoked by jazz music, visual improvisation, and an aesthetics of the cool traceable to the Congo region of Africa," writes his nominator.

Drawing inspiration from Dada, folk art, and African sculpture, Outterbridge recycles discarded materials, transforming them into poetic configurations that explore both social and political themes. In a career spanning fifty years that began with his seminal role in the Los Angeles assemblage movement of the 1960's and 70's, he has succeeded in creating and developing a unique visual language.

Asafetida Yoke

Asafetida Yoke, 2008, wood, metal, cloth. 30 x 13 1/2 x 3 1/2 inches. Collection of Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

"The result," writes Holland Cotter, "was ‘black art' that, by and large, avoided stereotypical markers of African-American identity and that was topically loaded without being overtly polemical." (New York Times, May 12, 2009).

Influenced by Marcel Duchamp, along with contemporaries Mark di Suvero and Robert Rauschenberg, Outterbridge was part of a group of African-American artists, including Betye Saar and David Hammons, who banded together while working in forms of Dada-inspired assemblage at the time of the 1965 Watts uprising; together with sculptor Noah Purifoy, Outterbridge salvaged his media from burned out buildings in the distressed neighborhoods of Watts and South Central.

Born in 1933, in segregated Greenville, North Carolina, Outterbridge credits his father, whose business was collecting and recycling metal machine parts and farm equipment, for teaching him to value discarded materials. He also credits his grandmother for inspiring him with the handcrafted necklaces and beaded pouches (Asafedita bags) she used in her healing practice. For Outterbridge, artifacts made by healers to ward off ailments and ill will, possess a curative and transformative aesthetic power that he aspires to deliver in his own work.

By manipulating found materials, such as broken glass, rusted steel, and hair, Outterbridge excavates personal and cultural histories that have been covered over, neglected, and hidden. Ragged Bar Code (2008), for example, consists of twigs wrapped with rags from LA's historic garment District, an area known for its sweatshops. In color and texture, the piece alludes to his mother's quilts, while suggesting, by means of its organic, repetitive forms, that even modernism can be considered a craft. Roberta Smith writes: "Mr. Outterbridge's Portrait of Willie gets right to the point, brilliantly extracting multiple yet focused meanings from detritus." (New York Times, December 10, 2009).

His career as an artist began when he moved to Chicago following a three-year stint in the army that earned him the GI bill he needed to go to college. Prior to the army, he had studied engineering for one year at the North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. In Chicago he studied painting, first at the Chicago Academy for the Arts (1956 – 59) and then at the American Academy of Art. During this period, he worked as a Chicago Transit Authority bus driver.

Portrait of Willie

Portrait of Willie, 2008, mixed media. 32 x 9 x 9 inches.

In 1963 he moved with his wife to Los Angeles, where he found a job painting in a production studio. The arduous monotony of painting for the production company all day and painting artworks for himself at night, led to his decision to switch mediums. After quitting his day job, he began making sculpture. For two years he worked in his backyard "just building, building, building. I started with stone and worked my way into metal and wood."

"He was doing fantastic things, as were his friends," writes Cotter. "But the chance to exhibit in mainstream galleries or museums was practically nil and seemed likely to stay that way. This reality, once he had fully grasped it, intensified his already passionate, principled immersion in community-based collaborations that operated outside market-approved models, redefined the term ‘artist,' and blurred distinctions between art, education and social action."

Beginning in 1975 Outterbridge served as Artistic Director of the Compton Communicative Arts Academy, and for 17 years, as Director of the Watts Towers Art Center. In addition to art making, Outterbridge has held the positions of art instructor and fine arts installer at the Pasadena Museum of Art (1967 to 1972). He also taught at the Claremont Colleges, UC Irvine, Cal State Dominguez Hills, and Pasadena City College. Eschewing a conventional art career, writes Cotter, "in recent years [Outterbridge] has built himself a studio and resumed regular production of individual pieces."

Throughout his career, Outterbridge received numerous awards, including the 1987 National Conference of Arts Educators' Award; a 1988 Fulbright Fellowship; and, in 1994, a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship; the J. Paul Getty Fellowship for the Visual Arts; the J.R. Hyde Visiting Artist Fellowship at the Memphis Institute of the Arts; and an honorary doctorate from Otis College of Art and Design.

"That his work is still little known outside of Los Angeles is remarkable," writes his nominator. "The Artists' Legacy Foundation award will go towards furthering the knowledge of this vital artist in California and beyond."

In 2009 Tilton Gallery in New York mounted a solo exhibition of the sculptor's work. His art has been exhibited in innumerable group shows and was featured in the Pompidou's Center 2006 groundbreaking exhibition, LosAngeles, 1955-1985: The Birth of an Artistic Capital. His art can also be found in the collections of the California African American Museum and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.



Septmeber 25, 2009

THE ARTISTS' LEGACY FOUNDATION AWARDS
$25,000 TO LLYN FOULKES

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA—The Artists' Legacy Foundation announced today that its third annual Artist Award of $25,000 will be given to painter Llyn Foulkes. The Foundation created the Artist Award to recognize and honor accomplishments of an outstanding visual artist whose primary medium is painting or sculpture.

Pop - by Llyn Foulkes

Pop, 1985-1990, mixed media with soundtrack. 84 x 123 x 3 inches. Collection of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles.

Mr. Foulkes' nominator wrote "Foulkes has been a major figure in the Los Angeles art scene since 1961 when he had a solo exhibition at the Ferus Gallery. Foulkes began as an abstract expressionist painter but by 1962 in his solo show at the Pasadena Art Museum, he showed emotionally charged, expressionist works that incorporated assemblage and found objects. His influence can be seen in several later generations of artists. Over his lengthy career, Llyn Foulkes has demonstrated exceptional talent, influence, perseverance and absolute dedication... [His life as an artist has been marked by] his inability to compromise, his slightly acerbic and irreverent wit, and the challenging aspect of his work to a general audience."

Mr. Foulkes has been a practicing artist for over 40 years. Currently his work can be seen in New York at Kent Gallery and in Santa Monica at Craig Krull Gallery. Born in Yakima, Washington in 1934, he now resides in Los Angeles. He attended the Chouinard Art Institute (now CalArts) and upon graduating won the First Award for Painting and the First Award for Drawing. Throughout the late sixties and early seventies, Foulkes became well known for his paintings of rocks and the desert landscape of Southern California. In the seventies Foulkes stopped making the rock paintings fearing that he had "lost his soul and was selling out." In 1973 he began a new series of paintings, which he referred to as "the bloody head paintings."

Since the early eighties, Foulkes has been working on a series of tableaux including several recent large scale projects, The Lost Frontier (1997-2005), a tour de force image of the Los Angeles landscape as a heavenly wasteland; Deliverance (2004-2007), depicting the artist right after he has murdered Mickey Mouse (for Foulkes, long a symbol of corporate brainwashing); and The Awakening (1994-2009), a highly emotional and personal painting of the artist and his ex-wife that he began in the early nineties during the breakup of his marriage. He works on the tableau paintings for years, adding and subtracting elements, and painting with textured paste and paint in his pursuit of the ultimate illusion of depth.

The Lost Frontier - Llyn Foulkes

The Lost Frontier, 1997-2005, mixed media with soundtrack, 87 x 96 x 8 inches.

Music has been a very important part of Llyn Foulke's life. "Painting is my torment and music is my joy," he says in a video. He performed in high school and later played drums with CityLights (1965-1971), followed by his own band named The Rubber Band (1973-1977). By 1979, Foulkes returned to a childhood interest in one-man bands, and constructed a machine from which he plays strings, keyboard, drums, horns, bells and sings. He performs regularly on the West Coast and in 2004 released a CD of original compositions entitled Llyn Foulkes and His Machine: Live at the Church of Art.

Mr. Foulkes was surprised by the award and when reached by phone said, "Receiving the Artists' Legacy Foundation's Artist Award is a total surprise. I am thrilled and delighted to accept it and it will help me a great deal." A ceremony honoring the artist will take place in Oakland, CA this October.

Artist's Website: www.llynfoulkes.com



September 30, 2008

THE ARTISTS' LEGACY FOUNDATION AWARDS
$25,000 TO PETER SAUL

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA The Artists' Legacy Foundation announced today that its second annual award of $25,000 will be given to artist Peter Saul. The Foundation created the Artist Award to recognize and honor accomplishments of an outstanding visual artist whose primary medium is painting and/or sculpture.or sculpture.

Peter Saul

Cold Sweat, 1999, acrylic on canvas. 55 1/8 x 66 7/8 inches. Courtesy of David Nolan Gallery, New York.

Peter Saul is a painter. His nominator wrote: "I have admired Peter Saul's work for twenty years because his paintings challenge our aesthetic values as well as light a fire under our social, political and sexual conscience. His art is not meant to please but to engage, much like its historical precedents: Gericault's Raft of the Medusa and Picasso's Guernica. In the 1960's Peter Saul began to mix acrylic paint with his oil paint and commit more absolutely to the imaging techniques of popular cartoons. What Saul achieves in color and texture, raises the bar for un-likeable painting, painting we approach not to feel good but to really see. Peter Saul is definitely one of a kind and is deeply admired by young artists."

Peter Saul has been a practicing artist for the past 50 years. Mr. Saul was born in San Francisco in 1934. He attended the California School of Fine Arts (today the San Francisco Art Institute) and Washington University School of Fine Arts in St. Louis. He has worked and lived in many places: Holland, France, and Italy during eight years after college; Mill Valley, CA, Chappaqua, NY, and Austin, TX during the next 36 years. Mr. Saul taught at the University of Texas at Austin from 1981 until 2000, when he retired and moved to New York. Since 2001 he has lived in New York City and Germantown, NY. He is currently represented by the David Nolan Gallery in New York (www.davidnolangallery.com).

Squeeze Pimple - by Peter Saul

Squeeze Pimple?, 2009, acrylic on canvas. 59 x 59 inches. Courtesy of David Nolan Gallery, New York.

Peter Saul: A Retrospective, a major survey of the artist's paintings and drawings, was organized by guest curator Dan Cameron and the Orange County Museum of Art. It is on view in Philadelphia at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts from Oct. 18 to Jan. 4 and it will travel to the Contemporary Art Center in New Orleans. The catalogue published in conjunction with the exhibition provides the following observations: "Inspired to a creative breakthrough after glancing at a copy of Mad magazine, promoted by the Surrealist Matta, and discovered in Paris, American artist Peter Saul (b. 1934) has created often difficult, funny, and trenchant works-'sick jokes,' according to Robert Storr. His paintings have taken on subjects ranging from embarrassing personal foibles to important events in American history such at the Vietnam War, the civil rights movement, and the atrocities at Abu Ghraib. Given the ongoing lack of recognition for the work of this controversial, influential, and pioneering artist, a deeper examination of Saul's career is long overdue." The 160 page catalogue includes essays by Dan Cameron and Michael Duncan and an interview by Robert Storr.

Mr. Saul was informed of the award by telephone and said: "Receiving the Artists' Legacy Foundation Award is a total surprise, and I am thrilled and delighted to accept it." A ceremony honoring the artist will take place in the San Francisco Bay Area this fall.

Each year, ten artists, either painters or sculptors, are nominated anonymously by five nominators for the Artist Award. This year the Foundation's panel of jurors included Polly Apfelbaum, painter; Richard Kalina , art critic, professor, painter, and art historian; and Gay Outlaw, sculptor. The nominators and the jurors are art world peers who are chosen for their expertise. The 2008 jurors agreed: "It was very challenging to select the award recipient because all ten nominees were extremely worthy."

The Artists' Legacy Foundation was established by artists Squeak Carnwath and Viola Frey and incorporated in Oakland, California in 2000. With the death of Viola Frey in 2004, her estate became the first to be transferred to the Artists' Legacy Foundation. Over time, the Foundation anticipates adding additional artists' estates.

The mission of the Artists' Legacy Foundation is to promote the art and legacy of Foundation artists after their deaths and to support and advance painters and sculptors of the highest quality through award and grant programs. The Artist Award program is designed to encourage recipients to spend more creative time in their studios and allow ongoing professional enrichment. As an award program there are no restrictions on the use of funds by the recipient.

Through publications and exhibitions, the Foundation serves as a resource to scholars, curators and the general public by deepening their understanding of the work of Foundation artists. Educational programs sponsored by the Foundation help inform artists about estate planning and choices they need to make about their work throughout their careers. In October 2008 a four week program on estate planning will be offered for working artists in conjunction with the San Francisco Art Institute. A collaborative project with the Joan Mitchell Foundation entitled, Creating a Lasting Record, extends the work of the Artists' Legacy Foundation. This project is enabling four older artists to document their artwork, creating data bases for future catalogues raisonne.



September 12, 2007

THE ARTISTS' LEGACY FOUNDATION AWARDS
$25,000 TO KATHY BUTTERLY

OAKLAND, CALIFORNIA The Artists' Legacy Foundation announced today its first award of $25,000, which will be given to New York artist Kathy Butterly. The Artist Award was created to recognize and honor the accomplishments of an outstanding visual artist whose primary medium is painting and/or sculpture.or sculpture.

Rock Paper Scissors - by Kathy Butterly

Rock, Paper, Scissor, 2005, porcelain, earthenware, glaze. 3 3/8 x 5 1/2 x 3 1/8 inches. Courtesy of Tibor De Nagy Gallery, New York.

The Artists' Legacy Foundation was established by artists Squeak Carnwath and Viola Frey and was incorporated in California in 2000. With the death of Viola Frey in 2004, her estate became the first to be transferred to the Artists' Legacy Foundation. Over time, the Foundation anticipates receiving additional artists' estates.

The mission of the Artists' Legacy Foundation is to promote the art and legacy of Foundation artists after their death and to support and advance established artists of the highest quality through award and grant programs, which are designed to encourage recipients to spend more creative time in their studios and for ongoing professional enrichment. As an award program there are no restrictions on the use of the funds by the recipient.

Through publications and exhibitions, the Foundation will serve as a resource to scholars, curators and the general public by deepening their understanding of the work of Foundation artists. Educational programs will help inform artists about estate planning and choices they need to make about their work throughout their careers. This October a four week program on estate planning will be offered for working artists in conjunction with the San Francisco Art Institute. A collaborative project with the Joan Mitchell Foundation entitled, Creating a Lasting Record, will extend the work of the Artists' Legacy Foundation. This project will enable four artists to document thirty years of their artwork, creating a data base for a future catalogue raisonne.

More Plenty - by Kathy Butterly

More Plenty, 2007, porcelain, earthenware, glaze. 7 1/2 x 7 1/2 x 7 1/4 inches. Courtesy of Tibor De Nagy Gallery, New York.

The recipient of the first Artists' Legacy Foundation Award, Kathy Butterly was selected solely by members of the Foundation's panel of jurors. Ms. Butterly's medium is ceramics. The artist was nominated anonymously and as her nominator said in the nomination letter: "I am particularly interested in her work because she crosses boundaries between craft and high art, and between sculpture, ceramic and painting. Abstract in form, often figurative in allusion, her pocket-sized porcelains are characterized by quirky, pop-surreal images with attitude, their discontent and subversion disguised by her remarkable, ingratiating range of luminous color and her breathtaking delicacy."

Kathy Butterly has been a practicing artist for the past 17 years and is represented by the Tibor de Nagy Gallery in New York www.tibordenagy.com. She is a graduate of the Moore College of Art in Philadelphia and received her MFA from the University of California, Davis. Ms. Butterly was surprised and delighted by the award and said: "It was Viola Frey who first got me excited about clay and enabled me to see it as a powerful, expressive sculptural medium. Receiving the first Artists' Legacy Foundation Award is a total surprise, and I am thrilled and humbled to accept it." A ceremony honoring the artist will take place in the Bay Area this fall.

An exhibition of Kathy Butterly's work will be presented in San Francisco at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts, 701 Mission Street @ 3rd, from November 3 through November 18, 2007. For information and directions to YBCA, please visit www.ybca.org.